Australian seascape and landscape photography

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Sunset at the Metung tree remnants

During a recent trip to Gippsland I was fortunate to be in the right place at the right time and experience an awesome sunset on the shoreline at Metung.

It was one of those rare occasions where the colour seemed to stay in the sky for ages.  It was truly a magical evening.  🙂

Metung, sunset, Jim Worrall, tree remnants, logs, beach, shoreline

The image above is available to purchase as a print here.

Pictured below, one of the iconic tree remnants on the Metung shoreline, side lit by the setting sun.

Metung, sunset, tree, remnants, log, shoreline, beach

The image above is available to purchase as a print here.

Pictured below, …Metung’s equivalent of the Loch Ness Monster, …..or perhaps it’s simply a tree remnant?  🙂

Metung, sunset, tree, remnants, log, beach, shoreline

Pictured below, a “behind the scenes shot” caught with my phone camera as the sky lit up.

Metung, sunset, Jim Worrall

Pictured below, a “behind the scenes shot” taken as the sky started to fill with colour. Photo courtesy of Mustang Sally.

Metung, Jim Worrall, Mustang Sally, sunset

 

 

 

 

 

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Sullivan Bay jetty – Sorrento

Following the destruction and subsequent rebuilding of this iconic jetty at Sullivan Bay, it took a few visits here for me to catch it in favourable light.

This is a long exposure of 204 seconds on a cloudy day giving nice diffused light.port phillip bay, long exposure, jim worrall, jetty, pier, mornington peninsula

The image above is available to purchase as a print here.

 


A Sunset at Olivers Hill – Frankston

Olivers Hiil, Sunset, Jim Worrall, Frankston

Last weekend we visited the new jetty at Olivers Hill in Frankston on the Mornington Peninsula.  As the sun dropped down towards the horizon the sky exploded in a way that we really didn’t expect.  It seems that predicting a colourful sunset in Melbourne is a bit like predicting the outcome of a coin toss.  🙂  These are short exposure shots using my phone camera as I left the “big boy”at home.

Olivers Hiil, Sunset, Jim Worrall, Frankston

In the image above, the glowing red “eyes” and silhouette of a small drone can be seen hovering near the top edge towards the left of frame.  The constant buzzing noise from these little buggers can ruin an otherwise tranquil atmosphere, …but hopefully the owner captured some great scenes from up there.  🙂

Olivers Hill Jetty, sunset, JIm Worrall, Frankston

 

Olivers Hill Jetty, sunset, Jim Worrall, Frankston, Mornington Peninsula


Sunset at Grantville jetty

Grantville, jetty, beach, sunset, Jim Worrall, long exposure, nd filters, Western Port Bay

Grantville is a small coastal town on the east coast of Western Port bay in Victoria, Australia.  The jetty at Grantville usually stands in relatively shallow water at high tide, and at low tide it stands proud on a bed of mud.  During a “king tide” the water can sometimes cover the walking platform at the end of the jetty as seen here.

Following are a couple of long exposure images taken at sunset during high tide.

Tech stuff for the image below – 157 sec f/18 ISO100 using an ND400 + ND8 filter.  This image is available to purchase as a print here.

Grantville, jetty, beach, sunset, Jim Worrall, long exposure, nd filters, Western Port Bay

Pictured below – Grantville jetty as the sunset fizzled out.

Tech stuff – 152 secs f/18 using an ND400+ND8 filter.  This image is available to purchase as a print here.

Grantville, jetty, beach, sunset, Jim Worrall, sunset, long exposure, Western Port Bay

If you’re hungry during your visit to Grantville then I highly recommend trying the homemade chunky beef pies at the Grantville Pantry.  It’s located directly across the highway from the jetty.   Real chunks of steak in a delicious gravy and housed in a beaut puff pastry casing. Great stuff!!   🙂  (…..and NO, I’m not sponsored by them!)  🙂

Pictured below – A selfie from the end of the Grantville jetty at low tide.  Mud as far as the eye can see.  🙂  This is a short exposure HDR image.

It’s available to purchase as a print here.

Jim Worrall, Grantville jetty, Western Port Bay, sunset, beach, low tide

 

 

 


Eagles Nest – Bass Coast

Eagles Nest is a popular rock formation and beach located on Victoria’s Bass Coast.  It’s about half way between Inverloch and Cape Paterson, and it’s well sign posted.

Pictured below, a couple of long exposure images from Eagles Nest on a bright afternoon with patchy cloud.  Conditions on the day were very photographically challenging as the sun was diffused by cloud one moment, then it would pop out with all it’s brutal harshness the next moment. This would happen several times during each long exposure causing many of my shots to be blown out.  Thankfully not all.  🙂

Technical stuff for both images – 150 sec f/18 iso50 using an ND500 and ND8 filter.

eagles nest, Jim Worrall, Inverloch, Cape Paterson, Bass Coast, long exposure, black and white, seascape

The image above is available to purchase as a print here.

eagles nest, jim worrall, bass coast, inverloch, cape paterson, long exposure, black and white, seascape

 


Warneet Sunset

Sometimes we don’t realize what we have until we view it through different eyes.

Warneet sunset 10-04-16
Tech stuff – 60 secs @ f/16,  10 stop solid ND + 4 stop soft grad.

Jim Worrall, western port bay, sunset, long exposure, ND filters


Shelley beach and Point King – ND group excursion

Last weekend we had our ND group excursion for beginners.  It was a great turnout with lots of enthusiastic people attending.  We started shooting at Bridgewater Bay in Sorrento in very difficult conditions with the wind blowing a continuous mist of fine rain onto our lenses.  I was both surprised and delighted that so many people stayed and had the patience to put up with these conditions, …..such a dedicated bunch.  🙂  Many thanks to Jason Cincotta and Michael Stringer for assisting with so many ND newcomers.

Later we moved onto the front beaches at Point King, Sorrento, followed by Shelley beach, Portsea , both providing us with much more friendly shooting conditions.

 

Pictured below – Point King jetty.  Tech stuff – 132 secs f/18.  This photo is available to buy as a print in many forms here.

Point King, jetty, Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, Sorrento, long exposure

Pictured below – Shelley beach, Portsea.  Tech stuff – 60 secs f/18.  This photo is available to buy as a print in many forms here.

Shelley beach, Shelly beach, Portsea, Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, jetty, pier, seascape, long exposure, port phillip bay

Pictured below – Shelley beach, Portsea.  Tech stuff – 136 sec f/18. 10 stop ND + 4 stop soft grad.  This photo is available to purchase as a print here.

shelley beach, shelly beach, portsea, jim worrall, mornington peninsula, seascape, long exposure

Pictured below – Most of the crew from the group excursion, Bridgewater Bay.

ND group excursion, bridgewater bay, jim worrall, jason cincotta, michael stringer, mornington peninsula, photo excursion

 

 

 

 

 


The Clash of Land and Sea – Cape Schanck

Some images from the wild n’woolly waters of Cape Schanck on the Mornington Peninsula.

Cape Schanck, Mornington Peninsula, Jim Worrall, long exposure, ND400The image above is available to purchase as a print at Redbubble.

Cape Schanck, Mornington Peninsula, Jim Worrall, long exposure, ND400The image above is available to buy as a print at Redbubble.

Cape Schanck, Mornington Peninsula, Jim WorrallThe image above is available to purchase as a print at Redbubble.

jim worrall, Mornington PeninsulaAbove – Behind the scenes.

Jim Worrall, Mornington PeninsulaAbove – Behind the scenes.


St Andrews Beach – Long Exposures

A collection of long exposure images from St Andrews Beach on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula.

seascape, beach, Jim Worrall10 seconds, f/13, iso100. The image above is available to purchase as a print at RedBubble.

Jim Worrall, long exposure, seascape, black and white30 secs, f/18, iso 100. The image above is available to purchase as a print at RedBubble.

Jim Worrall, seascape, long exposure, black and white15 seconds, f/14, iso100. The image above is available as a print at RedBubble.

Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, seascape, long exposure, black and white48 seconds, f/8, iso200. The image above is available as a print at RedBubble.


The Blowhole Track – Flinders Back Beach

A series of long exposure images from The Blowhole Track at Flinders back beach on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula..

Smooth Sailing.
360 sec f/8 iso 200
Jim Worrall, Flinders, Mornington Peninsula

Flinders Back Beach.
30 secs f/14 iso100
Jim Worrall, Blowhole Track, Mornington Peninsula

The Blowhole Track – Flinders.
20 secs f/11 iso100
Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, long exposure, ND400

Following are a couple of shorter exposures –

Flinders Blowhole Track.
1.3 secs f/8 iso100
Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, ND400, long exposure

0.4 sec f/8 iso100
blowhole track, Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula


Alienscape – St Andrews Beach

A couple of long exposure shots of rock formations at St Andrews Beach on the Mornington Peninsula.

Alienscape
Jim Worrall - long exposure - Mornington Peninsula - ND400

Jim Worrall - ND400 - long exposure - St Andrews Beach - Mornington Peninsula


SS Speke Shipwreck and Kitty Miller Bay

Following are a couple of long exposure images of the SS Speke shipwreck at Kitty Miller Bay on Phillip Island.
The first image was captured using an ND400 and two ND8 filters stacked together to achieve an exposure time of 195 seconds on a bright afternoon. Such a long exposure allows blurring of both the ocean waves and the moving clouds.

SS Speke shipwreck, Jim Worrall, Kitty Miller Bay, Phillip Island

The image below is a 13 second exposure. This shorter exposure allows misting of the waves but leaves the moving clouds only slightly blurred.
Jim Worrall, Kitty Miller Bay, Phillip Island, ND400

Pictured below, a 10 second exposure of surf washing over the dark rocks at Kitty Miller Bay.
Jim Worrall, Phillip Island

Below, a 2.5 second exposure of waves crashing onto the beach at Kitty Miller Bay.
Jim Worrall, Phillip Island

Finally, a 0.8 second exposure of a large wave slamming into a rock on Kitty Miller beach.
Jim Worrall, Phillip Island

If you’re new to long exposure photography using dark ND filters then you might like to check out this page for some tips to get you started.


Return to Shack Bay and Eagles Nest

Following are images from Shack Bay and Eagles Nest taken during an excursion with members from my Facebook group ND400 Long Exposure Photography.
Shack Bay and Eagles Nest are part of the Bunurong Marine Park located between Cape Paterson and Inverloch. Access to the beach is via stairs from the cliff tops.

Pictured below – A long exposure image from Shack Bay with the Eagles Nest rock formation in the background.
Jim Worrall - Shack Bay - Eagles Nest

Pictured below – The view from the end of Eagles Nest looking out to sea.
Jim Worrall - Eagles Nest - long exposure

Pictured below – Shack Bay looking back towards Eagles Nest.
Jim Worrall - Shack Bay - Eagles Nest

Pictured below, a series of candid images of ND400 Long Exposure Group members at Powlett River on the way back home from the excursion.
ND400 Long Exposure Group

ND400 Long Exposure Group

John Nabben

Jim Worrall - Powlett River

Jim Worrall - Powlett River

ND400 Long Exposure Group

Jim Worrall - Powlett River


Life on the Dunes – Powlett River

Powlett River - Jim Worrall - Life on the Dunes

Cormorants and gulls resting at the base of huge sand dunes at the mouth of the Powlett River.


A Fisherman’s Tale – Sorrento

Jim Worrall, Sorrento, fisherman, Mornington Peninsula

Jim Worrall, Sorrento fisherman, Mornington Peninsula

Jim Worrall, fishermen, Sorrento, Mornington Peninsula

Jim Worrall, sorrento, beach, Mornington Peninsula

Jim Worrall, fishermen sunset, Sorrento, Mornington Peninsula


Sunset at St Pauls beach – Sorrento

Following are some images from the beach at the end of St Pauls Rd, Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.

Jim Worrall St Pauls Sorrento Mornington Peninsula
The image above is available to purchase as a print in various forms here and here.

Jim Worrall St Pauls Sorrento Mornington Peninsula The arch image above is available to buy as a print here and here.

Jim Worrall St Pauls beach Sorrento Mornington Peninsula

Jim Worrall St Pauls cliff top Sorrento Mornington Peninsula


A Morning at Bushrangers Bay

Following are some long exposure images from Bushrangers Bay on the Mornington Peninsula.
The bay is accessible via a scenic walking track that begins at the Cape Schanck lighthouse carpark. Allow about an hour each way for the walk and make sure you carry some drinking water. There’s also an alternate walking track that goes from Boneo Road to Bushrangers Bay. Both tracks are about the same length.

Jim Worrall Bushrangers Bay Mornington Peninsula AustraliaThe image above is available to buy as a print at my Zazzle and Redbubble sites.
Jim Worrall Bushrangers Bay Mornington Peninsula AustraliaThe image above is available to buy as a print here and here.

Jim Worrall Bushrangers Bay Mornington Peninsula Australia The image above is available as a print at Redbubble.

Jim Worrall John Nabben Mornington Peninsula Australia


Pyramid Rock – Phillip Island

Images from the beautiful Pyramid Rock on the rugged south coast of Phillip Island, Australia.
You can reach the Pyramid Rock car park by driving to the southern end of Pyramid Rock Road which is located just west of the Grand Prix racing circuit.
It’s just a short walk along an elevated wooden path from the car park to the viewing platform. Yes,very civilized. 🙂

Below – A long exposure image of Pyramid Rock. This image is available to buy as a quality print at Zazzle or Redbubble.
Jim Worrall Pyramid Rock Phillip Island Australia

Below – Basalt Beach.
A long exposure image of waves crashing on the the dark basalt rocks on the beach near Pyramid Rock.
This image is available to buy as a quality print at Zazzle or Redbubble.
Jim Worrall Pyramid Rock beach Phillip Island Australia

Below – This is my friend “Wally”. He was following me around the cliff tops at the beach.
He was curious yet still cautious enough to keep a safe distance between us.
Jim Worrall wallaby Phillip Island Australia


Bay of Islands – Sorrento

Pictured below, a long exposure image from the Bay of Islands on the back beaches of Sorrento. Access to the Bay of Islands is via Diamond Bay Road, Sorrento. There’s a small car park at the of the road. On arrival at the car park take the walking track to Diamond Bay and branch left at the Bay of Islands sign. It’s an easy short walk to the viewing platform.
Access to the beach is discouraged by Parks Victoria due to erosion on the beach, hence a short climb down is required from the viewing platform if you want a view from sea level.Jim Worrall Bay of Islands Mornington Peninsula Sorrento
This image above is available to purchase as a print at my Zazzle and RedBubble sites.

Pictured below – A phone camera shot of a storm brewing over Diamond Bay as viewed from near the viewing platform.
Jim Worrall Diamond Bay Sorrento Mornington Peninsula

Pictured below – A phone camera shot of the rain rapidly approaching my vantage point. The rain caught up with me before I could make it back to the car. 😦

Jim Worrall Bay of Islands Sorrento Mornington Peninsula


The Gateway – Coronet Bay

Using the ND400 filter to obtain a ten second exposure during the afternoon at Coronet Bay, Victoria, Australia.

the gateway coronet bay jim worrall seascape black and white
This image is available to purchase as a quality print from my Zazzle and Redbubble websites.

The Overseer Coronet Bay Jim Worrall Western Port Bay


Flinders – Front and back beach long exposures

Following are a series of long exposure images from the front and back beaches of Flinders on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula.
flinders beach - mornington peninsula - jim worrall - australia
Pictured above – Flinders. 137 seconds f/13 ISO100. Available as a quality print at my Zazzle or RedBubble sites.

flinders beach - Mornington Peninsula - Jim Worrall - Australia
Pictured above – Flinders back beach. 102 seconds f/20 ISO100. Available as a quality print in various forms and sizes here or here.

flinders beach - mornington peninsula - jim worrall - australia
Pictured above – Flinders beach. 141 seconds f/13 ISO100. Available as a quality print at my Zazzle and RedBubble sites.

Flinders cormorants - Mornington Peninsula - Jim Worrall - Australia
Pictured above – A Break from Fishing. Cormorants resting after diving for fish at Flinders back beach. 61 seconds f/11 iso100. Available as a quality print here or here.

Flinders beach - Mornington Peninsula - Jim Worrall - Australia
Pictued above – Flinders back beach. 56 seconds f/13 ISO100. Available as a quality print in various sizes and forms here at my Zazzle and RedBubble sites.

Flinders - black and white - Jim Worrall

Flinders - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Australia


Sunset at Coronet Bay

IMG_0110_400

A boat ramp at Coronet Bay creates leading lines to the setting sun.


Death of the 60D

This is a commemorative post marking the drowning of my Canon 60D at Portsea beach last month. An outgoing wave pulled the sand out from under one of the legs of my tripod causing the whole rig to topple into the surf. The poor 60D was only 12 months old and was a replacement for my 40D which drowned in similar circumstances in early 2012. The event also marks the death of my Sigma 10-20mm, a true workhorse who managed to survive the first drowning in 2012.

death of the 60D jim worrall portsea
Above – Portsea beach. Quality prints available through Redbubble or Zazzle.

60D death jim worrall


In the surf at Kilcunda

A couple of long exposure images from the surf beach at Kilcunda.

Kilcunda ocean beach Jim Worrall

Kilcunda beach Jim Worrall


A Hot Starry Night at the Shed

An night time image from semi rural Devon Meadows. The foreground is lit by the long exposure picking up light from a neighbour’s house. Stars are apparent in the night sky.

A starry Night at the Shed -  Devon Meadows


Sunset at Dog Rocks, Batesford.

A sunset image taken at Dog Rocks, Batesford, Victoria, Australia. It was the 21st December 2012 which was supposedly meant to be our “last day on Earth”. Thankfully it was all hot air as expected. 😉

Dog Rocks Batesford, Victoria Australia Jim Worrall

The image is available to purchase as a high quality print through either my Zazzle or Redbubble websites.


Cat Bay and Ventnor, Phillip Island long exposures

It was a fine day with fluffy white clouds scooting along on the breeze. It didn’t take long for me to convince myself to go down along the coast and play with some dark ND filters.

Below – The old jetty remnants at Cat Bay, Phillip Island.
Cat Bay jetty - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - nd400 long exposure

Below – The old jetty remants at Cat Bay, Phillip Island.
Cat Bay - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - long exposure -nd400

Below – Summerlands beach, Phillip Island. I was lucky to catch this one with no footprints near it since this is a popular stretch of beach for the locals to wander on.
Summerlands beach - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - nd400 long exposure

Below – Red Rocks beach, Ventnor, Phillip Island.
Ventnor beach - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - nd400 long exposure

Below – Red Rocks beach, Ventnor, Phillip Island.
Ventnor beach - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - nd400 long exposure

Below – Red Rocks beach, Ventnor, Phillip Island.
Ventnor beach - Phillip Island - Jim Worrall - nd400 long exposure

Below – Some old jetty remnants at Grantville beach, shot at dusk on the way home.
Grantville jetty remnants - Jim Worrall - Western Port Bay - nd400 long exposure


How to use the ND400 for daytime long exposure photography

**Updated 30th Aug 2014 to emphasize the importance of blocking the viewfinder eyepiece**

The Aim of this Guide
———————-

I’ve written this guide to answer the most common questions that I receive regarding my NDX400 / ND400 long exposure photography.

This guide serves as a quick introduction to daytime long exposure photography for those who have never attempted it before. My aim is to explain the methods that I use with the intention of getting you shooting as quickly and simply as possible.

This is NOT designed as an in-depth technical guide. There are other guides on the internet that delve into all the maths and physics involved.

I will be adding to this page, or making corrections, from time to time as the need arises.

Flinders beach - Jim Worrall - long exposure - nd400 - ndx400

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What equipment do I need?
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– A camera –
Any DSLR camera will do the job nicely. An entry level DSLR is fine.
There are even a few compact cameras which are suitable. If your compact camera is tripod mountable, allows you to take control of ISO, aperture and shutter speed, and is capable of having filters attached then you can use that.

– A tripod –
You need to be able to keep the camera completely motionless during a long exposure. A tripod is by far the most convenient way to achieve this.

– ND filters –
You will need the following – 1 x Hoya NDX400 (or another manufacturers equivalent)
and 1 x Hoya ND8 (or another manufacturers equivalent)

The ND8 is used in conjunction with the NDX400 to give you more flexibility on bright sunny days.
These ND filters screw onto the end of the lens. They have threads on both the front and rear sides so it’s possible to have more than one filter screwed onto the lens at any given time.

There are alternative filter systems available whereby you slide a filter into a holder mounted on the front of the lens but I wont be discussing those here because I don’t use them.

I recommend that you avoid using (or buying) variable ND filters since they create unwelcome artifacts at the dark end of the range. Don’t waste your money on one of these if you intend to use it at the dark end.

– A remote shutter release – (optional)
If you only want to create exposures no longer than 30 seconds then a remote shutter release is an optional piece of gear. A remote shutter release only becomes necessary if you want to make exposures longer than 30 seconds.

NDX400 ND400 ND8 -  Jim Worrall

—————————————————
How do I compose the image through this black glass?
—————————————————

With an NDX400 filter on the end of your lens the first thing you’ll notice when you look through the camera’s viewfinder is extreme darkness. Even in daylight it can be difficult to see much more than silhouettes.

The easy way to get around this problem is to use the camera’s “live view” mode and compose your scene using the LCD on the back of your camera. Live view allows you to see straight through the filter.

As an alternative, if you like to do things the more fiddly way you can compose your image using the viewfinder with the filter off, then screw it on when you’re ready to take the shot. The disadvantage of this method is that you are removing and then refitting the filter for each new composition. That means that you’re MUCH more likely to accidentally drop your filter.

—————————————————–
How can I get the camera to focus through black glass?
—————————————————–

In real world daylight conditions, when using live view, I find that my camera is able to focus correctly in most situations with the NDX400 screwed onto the lens. Focusing can become a bit more troublesome when both the NDX400 and ND8 are on. Your results may vary of course depending on the model of camera you have.

If your camera is having trouble focusing you can remove one or more of the filters then do a half press of the shutter button. When the focus locks onto the subject you can then switch the lens to manual focus (MF) and refit the filter/s. The focus now shouldn’t move unless you accidentally handle the lens and move the focus ring.

Precise focusing is not so critical when doing long exposures if you’re using a wide angle lens. The combination of a wide angle lens and a small aperture (high aperture number) give you an image with great depth of field. This means that both near and far objects are in focus. Precise focusing DOES however become critical when you’re using a telephoto lens since the depth of field is now inherently much narrower compared to using a wide angle lens at the same aperture setting.
In the real world if I’m shooting seascapes with my 10-20mm lens I generally don’t care where it’s focusing because the depth of field is enormous at high aperture numbers. Conversely if I’m using my 70-200mm then I become very fussy about getting the focus correct.

——————————————–
How do I set up my camera for long exposures?
——————————————–

(The following procedure applies to exposures of 30 seconds or less.)

**Please note that it’s very important to block the viewfinder eyepiece to prevent light from leaking into your camera.**

1 – Screw the NDX400 onto the front of your lens.
2 – Select “2 second self timer” as your camera’s drive mode.
3 – Select your camera’s lowest ISO number. This will usually be 100 or perhaps 50 if you’re lucky.
two second timer - 100 ISO - Jim Worrall

4 – Put your camera into aperture priority mode and set your aperture to f/11 as a starting point.
Aperture Priority mode - Jim Worrall

Aperture Priority - f11 - iso 100 - Jim Worrall

5 – Select “live view mode” if your camera has it.
Select Live View - Jim Worrall

6 – With your scene composed the way you want it, half press the shutter button.
The camera should focus and calculate the exposure time for you.
If the camera doesn’t focus see the section above titled “How do I get the camera to focus through black glass?”

During the “half press” the exposure time should now be displayed somewhere on the camera’s LCD screen.
If you want to make the exposure time longer you can do this by increasing the aperture number.
If you want to make the exposure time shorter you can decrease the aperture number.

An alternative to cranking your aperture number up really high is to screw the ND8 filter onto the NDX400 which should already be mounted on the front of your lens.

7 – When you’re happy with the exposure time, complete a full press of the shutter button.
The camera should start the exposure in two seconds. That gives you time to get your hands off the camera and your body away from the tripod. The objective here is to disturb the camera as little as possible during the long exposure.

———————————————————————
What do I do if I don’t have “live view” mode available on my camera?
———————————————————————

You can use a similar procedure to the one described above with the exception that during the “half press” you will need to cover the viewfinder eyepiece to prevent light from entering.

If you do not cover the viewfinder eyepiece satisfactorily then light will enter the camera via the eyepiece during the “half press” and upset the camera’s exposure calculations. This will result in either black or very dark images.

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Troubleshooting – Why do my long exposure images look blurry or soft?
————————————————————-

Usually the problem is caused by movement of the camera or tripod during the long exposure.
If you’re in a windy environment such as an ocean beach, a howling wind can cause the tripod to vibrate and blur your images. In this case you need to find a way to dampen the vibration. In circumstances like this I usually hold onto the tripod during the exposure and use my weight to press down and dampen the vibrations as much as possible.
Always avoid having the neck of the tripod extended during strong winds as it makes the camera very susceptible to the wind.

On the subject of beaches, when you place your tripod on sand always push down as hard as you can to bed the tripod feet firmly. If you rest the tripod softly on the sand there’s every chance that it will slowly shift during your long exposure. This is particularly true at the water’s edge with waves lapping around the tripod feet.

Something else to be aware of is that smaller apertures (high aperture numbers) can make your images look slightly soft. I would encourage you to test your particular lens and camera combination to see how noticeable (or not noticeable) it is. Take a shot at say f/22 and another at f/11 and compare them to see if it’s a deal breaker for you.

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Troubleshooting – Why do my long exposure images look too dark?
————————————————
This is one of the most common questions I’m asked. If you’re shooting in any mode other than manual then chances are that the camera’s exposure system is being effected by unwanted light entering via the viewfinder eyepiece. Ordinarily this light would be negligible compared to the amount of light coming in through the front lens. When you put a very dark filter on the front lens this stray light coming in through the eyepiece becomes significant and has a major effect on the camera’s ability to calculate correct exposure.

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Troubleshooting – Why do my long exposure images have discoloured areas, bands, stripes or smears?
————————————————
The most common cause of such problems is light leaking into the camera through an uncovered eyepiece. Ensure that your camera’s eyepiece is adequately covered during long exposures to prevent leaks.

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Troubleshooting – Why do my long exposure images have some tiny brightly coloured dots?
————————————————
These bright coloured dots are often referred to as “hot pixels” or “stuck pixels”.
This is usually a temporary condition and the number of “hot pixels” tends to increase as the camera’s image sensor heats up. This can be a real problem if you have “live view” turned on for extended periods of time, particularly on warm or hot days. It’s a good idea to only have live view turned on immediately prior to taking your long exposure. The goal is to keep image sensor heating to a minimum.


Rye back beach – The Dragon’s Head and the Pod

A few images of the rock formations at the Number Sixteen beach at Rye.

Pictured below – The Dragon’s Head rock, initially named by a local with a fertile imagination.
Dragons head rock - Jim Worrall - Rye back beach - Australia - Mornington Peninsula

Below – The Pod, ….well I had to call it something since all of the good names like Dragon’s Head had already been snapped up.
The Pod - Jim Worrall - Rye beach - Sixteen - 16 - Mornington Peninsula - Australia

Below – Water flows off the rocky plateaus returning to the ocean.
Click to enlarge.
Rye - Number Sixteen beach - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Australia

Below – A couple of images of my friend lining up his gear for the money shots.
Rye - Number Sixteen beach - 16 - Jim Worrall - Stephen Pretty - Mornington Peninsula - Australia

Rye - Number Sixteen beach - 16 - Jim Worrall - Stephen Pretty - Mornington Peninsula - Australia


Sorrento – A Mornington Peninsula Jewel

Some afternoon long exposure images from Sorrento back beach on the Mornington Peninsula, Australia. The foreground rocks are submerged at high tide and are gradually revealed as the tide goes out. A long exposure time is used to smooth out the ocean waves into a mist.
Sorrento beach - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Australia - ND400 - long exposure

Sorrento beach - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Australia - long exposure - ND400

Sorrento beach - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Australia - long exposure - ND400

Prints of these images are available at my Zazzle and Redbubble websites.