Australian seascape and landscape photography

Posts tagged “Portsea

Sunrise at Point King – Portsea

An early morning long exposure from Point King, Portsea, on the Mornington Peninsula.

Tech stuff – 30 seconds at f/8 using an ND400 filter.

Jim Worrall, Point King, beach, Mornington Peninsula, long exposure, ND400, sunrise

This photo is available to purchase as a print here.

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Shelley beach jetty

A long exposure shot from Shelley (Shelly) beach in Portsea.

Tech stuff – 180 secs f/18,  10 stop solid ND + 4 stop soft grad ND.

jim worrall, shelley beach, shelly beach, long exposure, ND filter, NiSi, mornington peninsula, portsea, seascape

This image is available to buy as a print in various forms and sizes here.


Shelley beach and Point King – ND group excursion

Last weekend we had our ND group excursion for beginners.  It was a great turnout with lots of enthusiastic people attending.  We started shooting at Bridgewater Bay in Sorrento in very difficult conditions with the wind blowing a continuous mist of fine rain onto our lenses.  I was both surprised and delighted that so many people stayed and had the patience to put up with these conditions, …..such a dedicated bunch.  🙂  Many thanks to Jason Cincotta and Michael Stringer for assisting with so many ND newcomers.

Later we moved onto the front beaches at Point King, Sorrento, followed by Shelley beach, Portsea , both providing us with much more friendly shooting conditions.

 

Pictured below – Point King jetty.  Tech stuff – 132 secs f/18.  This photo is available to buy as a print in many forms here.

Point King, jetty, Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, Sorrento, long exposure

Pictured below – Shelley beach, Portsea.  Tech stuff – 60 secs f/18.  This photo is available to buy as a print in many forms here.

Shelley beach, Shelly beach, Portsea, Jim Worrall, Mornington Peninsula, jetty, pier, seascape, long exposure, port phillip bay

Pictured below – Shelley beach, Portsea.  Tech stuff – 136 sec f/18. 10 stop ND + 4 stop soft grad.  This photo is available to purchase as a print here.

shelley beach, shelly beach, portsea, jim worrall, mornington peninsula, seascape, long exposure

Pictured below – Most of the crew from the group excursion, Bridgewater Bay.

ND group excursion, bridgewater bay, jim worrall, jason cincotta, michael stringer, mornington peninsula, photo excursion

 

 

 

 

 


Time Traveller – Shelly beach Portsea

morington peninsula, Jim Worrall, portsea, long exposure, black and white

13 seconds f/8
This image is available to buy as a print in various forms at RedBubble.


Sierra Navada Rocks Selfie

An 8 second selfie at Sierra Navada Rocks at Point Nepean, Portsea.
I’ll definitely be making a return trip to this awesome structure.

Jim Worrall, Portsea, Point Nepean, Mornington Peninsula


Rye Back Beach – long exposures

Following are some images from my recent long exposure Facebook group excursion to Rye back beach. It was a great turn out considering a pre-dawn meetup in the middle of winter isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. 🙂

rye back beach - jim worrall

rye back beach - jim worrall

rye back beach - jim worrall

Following are a couple of images from under the London Bridge rock formation, Portsea, using my phone camera. My mate steadys himself ready to take some shots of the turbulent sea.
london bridge portsea - jim worrall - john nabben

london bridge portsea - jim worrall - john nabben


Death of the 60D

This is a commemorative post marking the drowning of my Canon 60D at Portsea beach last month. An outgoing wave pulled the sand out from under one of the legs of my tripod causing the whole rig to topple into the surf. The poor 60D was only 12 months old and was a replacement for my 40D which drowned in similar circumstances in early 2012. The event also marks the death of my Sigma 10-20mm, a true workhorse who managed to survive the first drowning in 2012.

death of the 60D jim worrall portsea
Above – Portsea beach. Quality prints available through Redbubble or Zazzle.

60D death jim worrall


A Stroll on Shelley beach – Portsea

A couple of images from a recent stroll on Shelley beach, Porstsea, Victoria.
It was one of those great days for photography. The clouds were very heavy causing a nice subdued light.
The threat of impending rain also meant I had the beach to myself, ……nice. 🙂

Safe Harbour – Shelley beach, Portsea
Safe Harbour - Shelley beach - Portsea - Jim Worrall - Australia - seascape - long exposure

Boat on Shelley Beach, Portsea
Boat on Shelley Beach - Portsea - Jim Worrall - Mornington Peninsula - Port Phillip Bay


Exploring the Point Nepean immigration quarantine station

Pictured below, the very industrial looking fumigation chambers in the Point Nepean quarantine station were once used to disinfect the belongings of recently arrived immigrants.
Point Nepean - Portsea - quarrantine - fumigation chamber - Jim Worrall

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarrantine - fumigation chamber - Jim Worrall

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarrantine - fumigation chamber - Jim Worrall

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarrantine - fumigation chamber - Jim Worrall

Pictured below, more images from around the historic buildings at the quarantine station.
Parks Victoria has a nice PDF explaining a little about the attractions here.

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarantine - Jim Worrall

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarantine - Jim Worrall

Point Nepean - Portsea - quarantine - Jim Worrall


Underground at Point Nepean

Point Nepean is located at the entrance to Port Phillip Bay and contains old military fortifications dating back to the 1880s.
Amongst the many features at Point Nepean are the old gun emplacements which are serviced by a series of interesting tunnels and purpose built rooms buried into the hill.
The underground atmosphere is enhanced by audio loops continuously playing the eerie sounds of a military yesteryear.

Point Nepean - Jim Worrall - military fortifications

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Point Nepean - Jim Worrall - military fortifications

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Point Nepean - Jim Worrall - military fortifications

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Point Nepean - Jim Worrall - military fortifications


The Jetties of Portsea and Sorrento

Portsea and Sorrento are coastal villages located at the tip of the Mornington Peninsula, south east of Melbourne. They both share a wild and woolly ocean beach to the south and the much calmer waters of Port Phillip Bay to the north. As a photography enthusiast I enjoy the contrast between the ocean and bay sides of the peninsula.

In winter and early spring you can stand on the ocean beach and not see another soul, a prospect I find very attractive. The only problem is that the wild and woolly conditions that keep the crowds away also make photography difficult. A photographer here has to contend with the difficulties of high winds and sea spray, not impossible I know but very annoying when combined with the low temperatures of winter.

For this reason I’ve found myself gravitating towards the calmer bayside beaches on my last couple of trips down that way.

Below – “34 Steps” which is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" "34 Steps" Portsea "Mornington Peninsula" beach "long exposure"

I’ve recently been trying to consciously simplify my images by attempting to exclude as many distracting elements as possible. Whilst shooting on the bayside beaches this has been fairly easy to achieve by using long exposures to reduce the detail in the water and sky. Another benefit of the long exposures is that birds and boats can move through the frame without even appearing in the finished exposure. I used a combination of an ND400 and an ND8 filter giving me about 12 stops of darkness to make the exposures up to 30 seconds long for these images.

Below – “The Danger of Diving”, Portsea beach, which is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" "The Danger of Diving" Portsea beach Australia "long exposure"

Portsea and Sorrento bayside beaches feature a wonderful collection of public and private jetties.
Below – “Outbound”, Sorrento beach, which is available to purchase as a print here.
Despite being technically over exposed I like the drama this high key image presents.
I like the way the sea and the sky are almost one. A personal favorite.
"jim Worrall" Sorrento beach australia mornington peninsula

Below – “Nature versus Nurture”, Portsea beach, which is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" portsea beach "Mornington Peninsula" Australia

Below – “Boomerang”, Portsea beach, which is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" Portsea beach "Mornington Peninsula" Australia "long exposure"

Below – “Civilization meets the Sea”, Portsea beach, is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" portsea beach "Mornington Peninsula" Australia "long exposure"

Below – “The Trappings of Wealth”, Sorrento beach, is available to purchase as a print here.
"Jim Worrall" sorrento beach "Morington Peninsula" Australia "long exposure"


Life during wartime.

A trip to Point Nepean provided some interesting photo opportunities.    It’s home to Fort Nepean, an abandoned military site overlooking the entrance to Port Phillip Bay.    There is an atmosphere of cold and concrete wherever you go within the underground maze of tunnels, rooms and gun emplacements.

When you wander around outside there are polite signs warning of unexploded munitions encouraging you to stay on the defined pathways.

Title – Life during wartime.

Title – Death by Machine.

Title – Grind.


The optical jewels at Sorrento.

My recent visit to the ocean beach at Portsea, (see previous blog entry), sparked a craving for more of the same photographic material.

This time I visited the ocean beach further along the coastline at Sorrento. The first visit to the beach was a spur of the moment decision. When I arrived there the sun was hovering just above the horizon, I had no time to explore the beach and it was a high tide. I took a few shots of the sun fading into the horizon and a few long exposure shots of waves swirling around the rocks.

Here’s a couple of the high tide shots –

Across the strait

Awaiting the change

The next visit to Sorrento beach was a bit better planned and I actually remembered to check the tide charts before leaving. On arrival the rock pools were at their low tide best, the sun was high enough in the sky to give me time to explore some of the rocky features yet low enough to give the area a nice warm glow.

Here’s some of the shots from the low tide visit –

jim_worrall_neptunes-lair.jpg

jim_worrall_tidal-pillar.jpg

jim_worrall_emerald-flow.jpg

jim_worrall_pool-guardian.jpg

jim_worrall_shellfish-harbour.jpg

jim_worrall_tidal-dawn.jpg

jim_worrall_standing-strong.jpg

If you would like to see any of these photos in a larger more detailed form they are available at –
http://www.redbubble.com/people/pixelmuser/

Please feel free to contact me at – jim.worrall@gmail.com


Visiting rock pool heaven.

I recently visited a tourist attraction called London Bridge in Portsea, Australia. It’s a large partially eroded sedimentary rock formation on the ocean beach.

When I arrived there the tide was luckily at its low point exposing a large area of rock pools surrounding the Bridge. It was a photographers heaven. There were lots of pools surrounded by large expanses of rocky plateau over which the gentle waves would occasionally flow.

Rock pool sunset

My original intention was to photograph the Bridge but I found the rocky shallows surrounding the bridge to be much more interesting. Since the sun was setting and it was getting dark it gave me the opportunity to try doing some long exposures, ….something that I haven’t tried before.

When moving water is photographed using a long exposure time the resulting image makes the water appear more like a fog or mist. The “misty” water running between some sharply focussed rocks looks wonderful (to me anyway).

Storm in the rock pools

From a technical perspective here are some camera settings details –

I had a polarizing filter on the front of the lens to reduce the amount of sky reflected off the water pools that were close to the camera. I set the camera to aperture priority (Av) and a set the aperture value to F11 to give a wide depth of field which means that objects in both the foreground and background would be in focus. Setting the aperture to F11 also gives the added benefit of forcing the camera to keep the shutter open for a longer time, which is an advantage in this case because I was trying to achieve a long exposure to “blur” the moving water.

I also changed the cameras ISO setting from the default of “auto” to “ISO 100” which makes the sensor effectively less light sensitive and forces the camera to keep the shutter open for longer as it tries to achieve a “correct” exposure.

Rocky plateau

As much as I hate using a tripod I certainly used one for this expedition. After fiddling around with the camera settings the average exposure for most shots was about 5 seconds, way too long for holding by hand.

I also used exposure bracketing for each shot so that I would have the flexibility to generate some HDR (high dynamic range) photos if required. This meant that the shutter was sometimes open for about 10 seconds or more.

Plateau sunset

If you would like to see some higher resolution versions of these photos or purchase prints you can find them at –

http://www.redbubble.com/people/pixelmuser/

If you would like to contact me by email then feel free to contact me at – jim.worrall@gmail.com